PUBLICATIONS

Justice in Aging publishes frequent issue briefs, reports and advocate’s guides that help on-the-ground advocates assist low-income older adults and persons with disabilities deal with often complex challenges related to federal and state benefits programs. Many of the issue briefs are also reflected in our ongoing, free webinar trainings. To ensure that you receive updates on the latest reports or trainings, sign up for our health or income network alerts.

Issue Briefs & Fact Sheets

Fact Sheet: Medicare Plan Enrollment Changes for Dual Eligibles and Low-Income Subsidy Recipients in California

By | CA Health Network Alert, FACT SHEET, Health Care, Medicaid, Medicare

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued new rules that limit enrollment and disenrollment from Medicare Advantage and Part D prescription drug plans for low-income Medicare beneficiaries. Previously, dual eligibles – individuals with Medicare and Medi-Cal coverage – and beneficiaries who receive the low-income subsidy (LIS) to make Part D prescription drug coverage more affordable could make enrollment changes any time throughout the year. The new rule, which became effective January 1, 2019, limits enrollment changes to once per quarter.

Justice in Aging has created a factsheet that explains these changes in detail and how they impact low-income Medicare beneficiaries in California.

Report: Older Women & Poverty

By | Economic Security, Health Care, Health Care Defense, Health Disparities, Health Equity, Long Term Care, Medicaid, Medicare, Nursing Homes, Oral Health, Safety Net Defense, SENIOR POVERTY, Social Security, Special Report, Supplemental Security Income

Because of structural inequities that impact women more than men, a significant percentage of older women are struggling to stay out of poverty.

There are 7.1 million older adults living in poverty in the United States, with nearly two out of three of them being women. Women like Venorica, who is working three jobs at the age of 70, and Vicky, who once ran a successful business with her husband, are struggling to stay afloat.

A new Justice in Aging report surveys the reasons more women are aging into poverty than men, discusses the support systems that are in place to help older women, and recommends ways we can strengthen and expand those support systems. The brief is accompanied by videos of women telling their own stories. Older women have cared for us and worked hard all of their lives. It’s imperative that we enact policies so they don’t have to struggle to make ends meet.

READ THE REPORT
WATCH THE VIDEOS HERE

Issue Brief: Medicaid Work Requirements and Family Caregivers

By | Health Care, Health Care Defense, ISSUE BRIEF, Medicaid, REPORTS, Safety Net Defense, SENIOR POVERTY

Medicaid Work Requirements can cause family caregivers to lose their health coverage, putting their health and the health of the older adults they care for in jeopardy.

With Thanksgiving on the horizon, our thoughts are on families and the 40 million family caregivers who provide care to an adult family member. Medicaid is an important source of health insurance coverage for those family caregivers who do not have access to other affordable coverage options. However, many states are in the process of designing or implementing policies that require family caregivers and others who are eligible for Medicaid to work a certain number of hours per month or qualify for an exemption to maintain their health coverage.

Implications for family caregivers

Low-income family caregivers may be unable to work sufficient hours at a paid job because of their caregiving responsibilities and may not qualify for the state’s exemptions. As a result, many will lose access to health care they need to maintain their own health, harming both their own well-being and the well-being of the older adults they care for.

A new Justice in Aging issue brief provides a state-by-state survey of how Medicaid work requirements apply to family caregivers and explains the harms they will cause to family caregivers and the older adults they care for.

READ THE BRIEF

Issue Brief: Medicaid Enrollees Put at Risk When State Medicaid Programs Assume Support from Family Caregivers

By | Health Care, Health Care Defense, ISSUE BRIEF, Medicaid

A new Issue Brief reveals how states’ assumptions often deprive Medicaid recipients of needed assistance.

Under Medicaid law, all assistance by friends and family members must be voluntary. This brief, based on a review of over 100 administrative decisions in several states, shows how Medicaid programs violate this law to the detriment of people on Medicaid. Medicaid programs often deny services based on family assistance that is not available. This puts lives at risk, increases the chances that a beneficiary will have to be institutionalized, and forces families to make impossible choices between caring for a family member and going to work.

The issue brief outlines states’ responsibility to respect the voluntary nature of assistance, examines how some states approach the issue, and suggests public policy responses to ensure that states authorize adequate assistance.

Rachel Gershon, of the University of Massachusetts Medical School’s Center for Health Law and Economics co-authored this paper with Justice in Aging attorney, Eric Carlson. The paper is part of a post-fellowship project with Justice in Aging and the Borchard Foundation Center on Law and Aging. 

Special Reports

Unique Legal Needs of Low-Income LGBT Seniors

The intersection of poverty and discrimination creates an array of unique legal needs for older LGBT individuals. A new Special Report by Justice in Aging, produced in partnership with Services and Advocacy for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, & Transgender Elders (SAGE), offers an overview and practical tips for legal aid organizations seeking to serve this population. The Report, How Can Legal Services Better Meet the Needs of Low-Income LGBT Seniors? is accompanied by a short video that highlights the diversity of the LGBT community and the gaps in equality its members face as they age.

READ THE REPORT

Homeless Among Older Adults

More older adults are homeless or at risk of homelessness than at any time in recent history. This special report, How to Prevent and End Homelessness Among Older Adults, created in partnership with The National Alliance to End Homelessness, outlines the problem and recommends policy solutions that can be put in place now to ensure that all older adults have a safe place to age in dignity, with affordable health care, and sufficient income to meet their basic needs.

READ THE REPORT

Advocacy Starts at Home

In this report, Advocacy Starts at Home: Strengthening Supports for Low-Income Older Adults and Family Caregivers, Justice in Aging draws the connection between fighting senior poverty, supporting caregivers, and the services needed to help older adults. The stress and expense of caregiving will touch every one of us at some point in our lives, but it can be devastating for poor families. In the paper, we identify clear solutions that will benefit everyone, while providing poor families with the basic support system they need to ensure that older adults in their families can age at home in dignity.

READ THE REPORT

Articles & Op-Ed

How Legal Aid Programs Can Address the Growing Problem of Senior Poverty

Legal aid organizations can play a critical role in securing the rights and benefits of the increasing number of older adults living in poverty. Justice in Aging attorneys Jennifer Goldberg, Fay Gordon, and Kate Lang authored a Special Feature for Management Information Exchange for Legal Aid (MIE) offering suggestions to help legal aid organizations structure their services to have the most impact, reach older adults with the greatest need, and increase their organizational capacity to serve low-income older adults.

READ THE ARTICLE

Medicaid and Supplemental Security Income Eligibility: Time for a Tune-Up

Medicaid and SSI are two essential programs that fight senior poverty by ensuring that low-income older Americans can meet their basic needs and maintain their health. In operation for 50 years (Medicaid) and 40 years (SSI), these workhorse programs are indispensable for seniors. But as the population ages and income inequality increases, both programs need retooling to improve benefits and increase access for more people who need them.

Justice in Aging attorneys Georgia Burke, Jennifer Goldberg, and Kate Lang published Medicaid and Supplemental Security Income Eligibility: Time for a Tune-Up,” in the spring issue of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA) Journal.

READ THE ARTICLE

New national center aims to enhance legal services for older adults

Early this year, Justice in Aging will launch the new National Center on Law and Elder Rights (NCLER). We are pleased to introduce the aging network to NCLER, a destination for legal and aging advocates who need legal resources to better serve older adults.

Read more from Justice in Aging attorney Fay Gordon in the op-ed New national center aims to enhance legal services for older adults,” from the January-February issue of Aging Today – the bimonthly newspaper of the American Society on Aging.

READ MORE

Balance billing: a tragic trend that is hurting our poorest elders

Every time I visit the doctor I get a bill for $15.27. I know I should not be receiving these, but I don’t want to ‘rock the boat.’ The doctor is in walking distance, so I don’t need to take public transportation. That saves me a lot because my income is only $329 a month. I ultimately do not know what I should and shouldn’t pay. I really feel anxious. I do not know what is going to happen with my healthcare.

I received two bills that I know I should not have received. I was sick and I needed the care, so I just paid them.

These stories reflect a growing trend of poor older adults being illegally billed for healthcare services covered by Medicare and Medicaid.

Read more from Justice in Aging’s Eric Carlson and Fay Gordon in the op-ed Balance billing: a tragic trend that is hurting our poorest elders,” from the May-June 2016 issue of Aging Today – the bimonthly newspaper of the American Society on Aging.

READ MORE