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“Just” Old People Are Dying: Ageism and the Coronavirus Response

By | Health Equity, IN THE NEWS, Long Term Care, Medicaid, Newsroom, Uncategorized

KQED Forum: “Just” Old People Are Dying: Ageism and the Coronavirus Response (May 21, 2020)

Nearly 80% of those who have died from COVID-19 in California were over the age of 65, yet health care for seniors was slashed in the Governor’s proposed state budget. Advocates for the elderly say its just another example of ageism, which has been exacerbated during the pandemic. From suggestions that old peoples lives be sacrificed for the sake of the economy to the struggle to get PPE and tests in nursing homes, guests on the show discussed the role ageism is playing in the coronavirus response. Justice in Aging Executive Director, Kevin Prindiville was a guest on the show.

The US Communities Hit Hardest by COVID-19 are also the most Ignored

By | IN THE NEWS, Uncategorized

Quartz: The US Communities Hit Hardest by COVID-19 are also the most Ignored (May 21, 2020)

People who aren’t proficient in English—particularly those who are older, and may not be tech-savvy enough to find the resources they need online—have largely been left out of the conversation around Covid-19, and their care has fallen through the cracks. Justice in Aging attorney, Denny Chan, was interviewed for this piece and talks about one problem being that intersectional data isn’t being collected. “Not everyone is collecting or reporting intersectional data deaths broken down by age. That means aid organizations have to go by the anecdotes they hear. What we know is true on the ground is that older adults and older people of color are more likely to have severe complications.”

 

Llegar a la tercera edad como inmigrante, sin pensión y sin seguro médico

By | Health Care, Health Disparities, Health Equity, IN THE NEWS, Language Access, SENIOR POVERTY, Uncategorized

La Opinion: Llegar a la tercera edad como inmigrante, sin pensión y sin seguro médico, (March 28, 2020)

This article talks about how difficult it is for older adult immigrants who have no pension or health care to meet their basic needs during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially if they lost their jobs due to the pandemic. Justice in Aging attorney, Denny Chan, was interviewed for this article.

Se estima que de 2.2 millones de personas sin documentos que viven en California, el 2% son mayores de 65 años, según un informe del UC Berkeley Labor Center. “Muchos trabajadores inmigrantes han perdido su trabajo y están luchando para satisfacer sus necesidades para vivir; una catástrofe como una hospitalización de un miembro de la familia, los podrá en dificultades económicas”, agregó. “Un seguro médico protege a los estadounidenses de los costos médicos altos e inesperados, pero sin esos beneficios, las familias inmigrantes enfrentan altos riesgos de muerte y desesperación”. Denny dijo que, “en estos momentos la comunidad inmigrante, documentados o no, viven situaciones muy complicadas por las políticas antiinmigrantes por parte de la administración Trump.”

Some Assisted-Living Residents Don’t Get Promised Care, Suit Charges

By | ASSISTED LIVING, IN THE NEWS, Uncategorized

New York Times: Some Assisted-Living Residents Don’t Get Promised Care, Suit Charges (February 14, 2020)

It’s common in Assisted Living facilities to regularly assess individual residents to determine whether a resident needs help bathing or dressing, for example, or suffers from dementia. But often the results of those assessments are used to show increasing need, and to justify increased costs, but not to make staffing decisions to reflect the greater needs and costs. Now a group of law firms is suing California assisted living facilities. There are several ongoing suits. Justice in Aging attorney, Eric Carlson, was interviewed for this story. About the lawsuits and what they uncover he said, “It gets at internal systemic issues. When facilities disclose information like how much time staff members spend on tasks, it gets at what’s happening behind closed doors.”

Medicare Doesn’t Cover Dental Care. For Many Florida Seniors, That’s a Problem

By | Health Equity, IN THE NEWS, Medicare, Oral Health, Uncategorized

Miami Herald: Medicare Doesn’t Cover Dental Care. For Many Florida Seniors, That’s a Problem (December 20, 2019)

Spotty coverage — combined with high oral health costs — means many older adults like Domínguez and Morejón, the two people discussed in this story, have no path to getting dental care. According to Justice in Aging, a national non-profit legal advocacy organization, only half of all 60 million Medicare beneficiaries saw a dental provider in the past year. “When we speak with older adults, lack of access to dental care is very much top of mind for them,” said Jennifer Goldberg, Justice in Aging’s Deputy Director. “And that lack of access to dental coverage has a disparate impact on populations of color.”

Medicaid Work Requirement Red Tape Threatens Coverage for Family Caregivers

By | BLOG, Uncategorized
More and more states are moving to restrict Medicaid coverage by requiring low-income adults to report that they are working. In fact, the list of states that are in the process of designing or implementing these so-called “community engagement” or work requirement policies has grown to seventeen. Unfortunately, these harmful policies are especially dangerous for family caregivers because they create so much red tape and ignore the stressful and often complex situations these individuals face.

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Florida Faces ADA Lawsuit Over Medicaid HCBS Wait List

By | IN THE NEWS, Uncategorized

Open Minds: Florida Faces ADA Lawsuit Over Medicaid HCBS Wait List (January 27, 2019)
This health care trade publication article summarized our complaint in the case Alexander et al., v. Florida Agency for Health Care Administration, including the key facts of the case and noted Florida’s lack of an Olmstead Plan to guide the delivery of services for class members in the least restrictive placement to meet their needs. The article is behind a paywall that can be accessed by members here.

 

 

AARP Celebrates Justice in Aging’s Denny Chan, Recipient of the Asian American Pacific Islander Hero Award

By | IN THE NEWS, Uncategorized

On Wednesday, January 23rd. AARP honored Justice in Aging attorney Denny Chan with its Asian American Pacific Islander Hero Award for his work to advance language access for limited English proficient older adults. Several members of the media attended the event at AARP’s California headquarters in Pasadena. See the list of clips below.

  • ETTV News News segment aired on Jan 29, 2019
  • Sampan.org January 24, 2019
  • MeiMin.us January 24, 2019
  • ChineseDaily.com January 26, 2019
  • ESO411.com January 28, 2019
  • Chinese L.A. Daily News Jan 26, 2019 Print Issue
  • Zhong Guo Daily News January 26, 2019 Print Issue
  • World Journal, January 24, 2019

Beneficiary Advocates Urge Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services to Correct Inaccuracies in Medicare & You Handbook for 2019

By | PRESS RELEASE, Uncategorized
Washington, DC – The Center for Medicare Advocacy, Justice in Aging and the Medicare Rights Center sent a joint letter to Seema Verma, Administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), on May 15, 2018, objecting to serious inaccuracies in the draft Medicare & You Handbook for 2019, and urging CMS to rectify the errors prior to disseminating the Medicare & You Handbook.

Medicare & You is the official government publication designed to provide beneficiaries with factual information about the Medicare program, their choices for obtaining coverage, and the benefits they can expect. Unfortunately, the draft 2019 Handbook includes inaccurate descriptions of the differences between Original Medicare and private Medicare Advantage plans. Without fair and accurate information, older adults, people with disabilities and their families cannot make informed choices about their health care coverage. Read More