Category

FACT SHEET

Fact Sheet: Medicaid Non-Emergency Medical Transportation for Older Adults: A Critical Benefit at Risk

By | FACT SHEET, Health Care, Medicaid, Medicare, REPORTS

Non-Emergency Medical Transportation (NEMT) is a federally required Medicaid benefit. Within certain guidelines, each state Medicaid program is given significant discretion in crafting the NEMT benefit for Medicaid beneficiaries. This important program currently serves over 7 million Medicaid enrollees who, due to cognitive and physical changes, may have a reduced ability to drive or use public transportation. It is now under threat.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has signaled that it will propose a regulation in May 2019 to make the mandatory NEMT benefit optional for states. States could then choose to amend their Medicaid rules to eliminate or reduce the benefit.

A new Justice in Aging fact sheet provides advocates with information about why NEMT is important, how it is administered, and the current threat to this vital benefit, as well as information on where to go for more information and advocacy tips for preserving the NEMT benefit in their states.

Justice in Aging is working in coalition with partners like Community Catalyst to raise awareness about the importance of Medicaid transportation to ensure it remains a covered benefit.

Fact Sheet: CMS Regulations Set Ground Rules for D-SNP

By | DUAL ELIGIBLES, FACT SHEET, Health Care, Medicaid, Medicare, REPORTS

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently finalized rules implementing regulations governing minimum integration standards for Dual Eligible Special Needs Plans (D-SNPs) pursuant to the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018. D-SNPs are Medicare Advantage plans that limit enrollment to individuals who are dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid. With the permanent authorization of D-SNPs, we expect to see an increase of D-SNPs entering the market across the country.

Justice in Aging has analyzed the new regulations and created a new factsheet summarizing the major integration requirements including special considerations for advocates.

Fact Sheet: Seniors and People with Disabilities Who Receive SSI Can Apply for CalFresh in Summer 2019

By | CA Health Network Alert, Economic Security, FACT SHEET, REPORTS, Supplemental Security Income

Due in part to advocacy from groups like Californians for SSI, the 2018-2019 state budget included a policy change allowing California seniors and people with disabilities who receive SSI to be eligible for CalFresh (SNAP) benefits starting June 1, 2019.

Access to federal SNAP nutrition assistance will increase food security for California’s low-income SSI seniors and people with disabilities, leading to fewer people being forced to choose between basics like food and medicine, and giving people more flexibility to direct money toward other needs such as finding and being able to afford housing. The expansion will be particularly important for seniors age 60 or older, who represent more than half of the over 1.2 million low-income Californians who receive SSI to help meet their basic needs.

Aging services providers can learn more details about this important and historic change in a new fact sheet from Justice in Aging. The five-page fact sheet helps providers understand the details of the change in order to better support their clients. The fact sheet also includes information on CalFresh rules that will be particularly relevant for enrolling SSI seniors and people with disabilities this summer and beyond.

Fact Sheet: Make the Expanded Spousal Impoverishment Protection Permanent

By | FACT SHEET, Health Care, Home & Community Based Services, Medicaid, REPORTS

Married seniors and adults with disabilities overwhelming want to live at home and age in place. Increasingly, federal and state Medicaid rules have prioritized home and community-based services (HCBS) which allow people to stay in their homes and in their communities. Congress recently helped these efforts by expanding a Medicaid eligibility rule, known as the spousal impoverishment protection, to individuals eligible for HCBS. The protection makes it possible for an individual who needs a nursing home level of care to qualify for Medicaid while allowing their spouse to retain a modest amount of income and resources. However, the expansion of the spousal impoverishment protection is set to expire on March 31, 2019 unless Congress acts. This means that individuals who qualified under the expanded protection may lose access to Medicaid and to their HCBS and may be left with no choice but to move into institutional long-term care, away from their spouses.

Letting the spousal impoverishment protection expire will hurt families and force more people out of their homes and their communities. We urge Congress to make the expanded spousal impoverishment protection permanent so seniors and people with disabilities can age in place and with dignity.

Justice in Aging has created a fact sheet on the importance of the expanded HCBS spousal impoverishment protection and calling on Congress to make it permanent so seniors and people with disabilities can age in place and with dignity.

Fact Sheet: Medicare Plan Enrollment Changes for Dual Eligibles and Low-Income Subsidy Recipients in California

By | CA Health Network Alert, FACT SHEET, Health Care, Medicaid, Medicare

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued new rules that limit enrollment and disenrollment from Medicare Advantage and Part D prescription drug plans for low-income Medicare beneficiaries. Previously, dual eligibles – individuals with Medicare and Medi-Cal coverage – and beneficiaries who receive the low-income subsidy (LIS) to make Part D prescription drug coverage more affordable could make enrollment changes any time throughout the year. The new rule, which became effective January 1, 2019, limits enrollment changes to once per quarter.

Justice in Aging has created a factsheet that explains these changes in detail and how they impact low-income Medicare beneficiaries in California.

Fact Sheets: New Resources on How Trump’s Public Charge Impacts on Older Adult Immigrants

By | CA Health Network Alert, Economic Security, FACT SHEET, Health Care, Medicaid, Social Security

Advocates are preparing to respond to a new “public charge” rule from the Trump Administration that would put immigration status at risk if an immigrant seeks access to an array of programs that support health, nutrition, and economic stability.

If implemented, this rule would harm older immigrants, their families, and caregivers. The rule would make it much more difficult for U.S. citizens and residents to welcome aging parents or other family members into the country. Seniors and their families may be afraid to go to the doctor or get helping paying for food or rent. Additionally, many immigrant older adults work as caregivers for very low pay. This rule would make it harder for them to access benefits like Medicaid and SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program).

Justice in Aging has a new fact sheet that provides an overview of the harms to older adults, their families, and caregivers that the Trump Administration’s changes to the “public charge” rule pose.  A California fact sheet provides an overview of these harms looking at California-specific data and programs.

Fact Sheet: SSA Clarifies Handling of Medicare Part A Conditional Applications

By | FACT SHEET, Health Care, Medicare, Social Security
Many people do not have enough work history to qualify for premium-free Medicare Part A benefits, however there is still an option for low-income individuals to get their Medicare Part A premiums paid.

A new Justice in Aging fact sheet details how they can enroll in the Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB) Program to get their Medicare premiums paid through their state Medicaid program. Enrolling in QMB can be confusing for people without Part A coverage and often requires visits to both the Social Security Administration office and the state’s Medicaid program offices. A further complication is that many Social Security offices have used conflicting and incorrect procedures or provided misinformation to applicants. Read More

How Medicaid Work Requirements Will Harm Older Adults & Family Caregivers

By | FACT SHEET, Health Care, Health Care Defense

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services issued guidance allowing states to condition Medicaid eligibility on fulfilling work and “community engagement” requirements. Under this policy, states can require adults to work in order to receive Medicaid if they are under age 65 and not disabled under the Social Security Administration’s strict definition. Although states are required to exempt some individuals who cannot work based on their health conditions, and encouraged to allow caregiving hours to count as work, all of these individuals will still be subject to onerous reporting requirements. This presents a significant barrier to health care access for many of the nearly 9 million adults ages 50 to 64 who rely on Medicaid, as well as nearly 5 million people with disabilities and chronic health conditions who do not receive Social Security Disability or Supplemental Security Income, and family caregivers. Learn more with our factsheet!

Supporting Older Americans’ Basic Needs: Health Care, Income, Housing and Food

By | FACT SHEET, Health Care, Health Care Defense, ISSUE BRIEF, Medicaid, Medicare, SENIOR POVERTY, Social Security, Supplemental Security Income

Older adults and their families strive each day to pay for health care and medicine, keep food on the table, have a roof over their heads, and have enough cash on hand to pay the utilities, get where they need to go and meet other basic needs. As families work together to meet these challenges, they are supported by a broad range of federal programs that provide Americans with the means to thrive as they grow older and remain at home and in their communities.

This issue brief discusses how these various programs work, who is eligible for them, and how they support the health and economic well-being of older Americans. For a quick overview, check out the fact sheet.

Fact Sheet: Health Care Provisions in the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018

By | DUAL ELIGIBLES, FACT SHEET, Medicare

On February 9, Congress passed the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 (BBA of 2018). In addition to its budget provisions, the BBA extends and makes changes to several Medicare programs and provides funding for other health programs that support low-income older adults, people with disabilities, and their families.

Justice in Aging has prepared a summary of some of the major health provisions in the BBA of 2018, including funding for Community Health Centers and outreach to low-income Medicare beneficiaries, the Medicare therapy cap repeal, Part D “donut hole” closure, and authorization of Special Needs Plans and other Medicare Advantage changes. As these changes are implemented, Justice in Aging will continue to provide updates and analysis and identify advocacy opportunities.

Read the Fact Sheet