Category

Medicaid

Free Webinar: What’s Next for California’s Dual Eligibles? CalAIM and the Coordinated Care Initiative

By | CA Health Network Alert, Health Care, Medicaid, Medicare, WEBINAR, Webinar Trainings

When: Thursday, January 16, 2020 from 10 a.m.-11 a.m. PT/1-2 p.m. ET

In 2014, California’s Department of Health Care Services launched the Coordinated Care Initiative for dual eligibles in certain counties. It provided dual eligibles with an option to enroll in an integrated Medicare-Medicaid plan called Cal MediConnect. Now, California has proposed ending Cal MediConnect and transitioning to a statewide Dual Special Needs Plan (DSNP) model with managed Long-Term Services and Supports (MLTSS). It is also proposing changes to the Medi-Cal Long-Term Care benefit and the Multipurpose Senior Services Program (MSSP) and requiring dual eligibles to enroll in Medi-Cal managed care across the state. This webinar will unpack the major proposed changes that affect dual eligibles, including:

  • A brief overview of the Coordinated Care Initiative and Cal MediConnect;
  • Discussion of the major components of the CalAIM proposal that impact dual eligibles, including the D-SNP transition, mandatory Medi-Cal managed care enrollment, and changes to long-term care and MSSP, and what these changes mean to counties in and out of the Coordinated Care Initiative;
  • Areas that are ripe for advocacy based on the CalAIM proposal; and
  • How advocates and other stakeholders can provide input on the proposed changes.

Who should participate:
Advocates who work with California’s dual eligibles, individuals interested in California’s dual eligible demonstration, and other stakeholders.

Presenter:
Denny Chan, Senior Staff Attorney, Justice in Aging

This webinar took place on Thursday, January 16, 2020, from 10 a.m.-11 a.m. PT/ 1-2 p.m. ET. 

Closed captioning will be available during this webinar. A link with access to the captions will be shared through GoToWebinar’s chat box shortly before the webinar start time. 

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Dozens of Senior Care Homes That Broke Labor Laws Continue to Get Medicaid Funds

By | IN THE NEWS, Medicaid, Nursing Homes

Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting: Dozens of Senior Care Homes That Broke Labor Laws Continue to Get Medicaid Funds (December 14, 2019)

This story is the fourth in an investigative series about wage theft and worker exploitation in Medicaid-funded board and care homes in California, Florida, Oregon, and Wisconsin. Companies may be prohibited from collecting Medicaid if they have been convicted of Medicare or Medicaid fraud or patient abuse or neglect, among other offenses. However, the federal agency that administers Medicaid – the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services – does not police whether senior care-home operators comply with wage and hour laws. “Medicaid certification is a privilege, not a right, and payment should depend upon complying with relevant laws,” said Eric Carlson, a directing attorney at Justice in Aging. “Underpaying employees is a red flag for health care quality.” This story also appeared in The New York Times, Washington Post, Minneapolis Star Tribune, Seattle Times, US news and World Report, and the San Diego Union Tribune.

California’s Master Plan For Aging: Make Medi-Cal More Affordable

By | FACT SHEET, Long Term Care, Medicaid, Toolkit

California has committed to developing a Master Plan for Aging in order to meet the needs of older adults today and for generations to come. Justice in Aging will release a series of short papers containing specific policy recommendations, developed with partners, that the Master Plan for Aging must include to meet its goals to advance equity, increase economic security and safety, and improve access to quality, affordable health care and LTSS programs.

The first in this series of papers, Make Medi-Cal More Accessible and Affordable, offers eight specific policy recommendations for improving Medi-Cal in order to ensure that every low-income older adult in California is able to access high quality, affordable health care. This paper was developed with developed with partners at Disability Rights California and Western Center on Law & Poverty.

 

Many Enrolled in California Healthcare Plan Lack Interpretation Services, Surveys Show

By | DUAL DEMONSTRATIONS, DUAL ELIGIBLES, IN THE NEWS, Language Access, Medicaid, Medicare

The Sacramento Bee: Many Enrolled in California Healthcare Plan Lack Interpretation Services, Surveys Show (November 6, 2019)

Half of the non-English speaking people enrolled in Cal MediConnect reported they could never get a medical interpreter when they needed one, according to a survey conducted by San Francisco State University. Currently, Cal MediConnect is a pilot program that coordinates care for dual eligibles in seven California counties. However, a similar program will be rolled out that requires all of California’s dual eligibles to receive care through managed care plans. This new program is called CalAim. “Our experience in Cal MediConnect can be used to predict where potential language access barriers might be in this new model ‘CalAim’,” said Denny Chan, senior staff attorney at Justice in Aging. “Sooner or later, this will affect all duals across California. The agencies want to move people to managed care plans across the state, so it is important for us to make sure these problems don’t continue.”

Issue Brief & Fact Sheet: What’s at Stake for Older Adults When States Eliminate Retroactive Medicaid Coverage?

By | Affordable Care Act, FACT SHEET, Health Care, ISSUE BRIEF, Long Term Care, Medicaid

Retroactive Medicaid coverage is a key financial protection that helps older adults and others who develop sudden illnesses or long term care needs access the care they need right away. It is a smart policy intended to protect low-income people from crushing medical debt in instances where they need emergency medical or long-term care and cannot apply for Medicaid immediately. But several states are eliminating this protection through Medicaid demonstration waivers approved by the federal government.

A new Justice in Aging issue brief—Medicaid Retroactive Coverage: What’s at Stake for Older Adults When States Eliminate This Protection?—discusses typical situations that cause older adults to need Medicaid retroactive coverage, and how the policy helps them access care, while protecting them from financial hardship. The issue brief also delves into how states are using waivers to eliminate this coverage, which states are doing so, and how older adults, their families, and health care providers are harmed when the coverage is eliminated. A companion fact sheet provides a higher level view of the issue.

 

FAQ: Low-Income Subsidy (“Extra Help”) for Dual Eligibles Receiving Home and Community-Based Services

By | FACT SHEET, Health Care, Health Care Defense, Home & Community Based Services, Medicaid, Medicare, REPORTS

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) enables full-benefit dual eligibles who receive certain Medicaid home and community-based services (HCBS) to receive Medicare Part D covered drugs at no cost. This requirement is called institutional cost-sharing, and was designed to put people who receive HCBS at home on an equal footing with those who are in institutions (who are also not charged any co-pays). Unfortunately, despite the institutional cost-sharing requirement, pharmacies still ask dual eligibles to pay co-pays for covered drugs.

Justice in Aging created an FAQ, Low-Income Subsidy (“Extra Help”) for Dual Eligibles Receiving Home and Community-Based Services, to give advocates working with dual eligibles the tools they need to prevent these co-pays. The FAQ discusses whom the cost-sharing rule applies to, the length of the cost-sharing protection, and what to do if a dual eligible HCBS-enrolled individual is prompted for a co-pay at the pharmacy or is entitled to a refund. Advocates should review the FAQ and make sure to their HCBS-enrolled dual eligibles are not paying any co-pays for their Part D drugs.

Free Webinar: The Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB) Program—An Update for Advocates: Part 2 of 2

By | Health Care, Medicaid, Medicare, WEBINAR, Webinar Trainings

When: Wednesday, July 24, 2019 11 am-12 pm PT/2-3 pm ET​

The Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB) program provides significant Medicare cost savings to low income individuals, including payment of Medicare premiums and protection from liability for any Medicare co-insurance or deductibles for health services. Those enrolled in the program also are automatically enrolled in the Part D Low Income Subsidy program (LIS). Despite its value, the QMB program is chronically under-enrolled. Many eligible individuals don’t know about the program or face barriers when they try to enroll. Those who are enrolled often face difficulties in accessing QMB protections.

This two-part webinar series gives advocates updated information on the QMB benefit and tools to use to ensure that their clients are enrolled and can use the benefit effectively.

Part One provides an overview of the QMB program, including eligibility criteria and program basics and focus on the specifics of QMB billing protections. We focus on recent improvements that make it easier for QMBs and their advocates to understand their payment responsibilities and the tools available to address problems with providers who improperly bill QMBs. We also distinguish between the QMB program and a Medicaid agency’s Part B buy-in agreement, and discuss QMB issues in Medicare Advantage.

Part Two focuses on enrollment. It looks at barriers to QMB enrollment, including problems that have arisen in various states and advocacy approaches, especially for individuals with Medicaid linked to Supplemental Security Income. We explore both ways to untangle individual problems and ways to work with your state to improve QMB enrollment systemically.

Who should participate:
Aging and legal advocates, community-based providers and others who counsel older adults on health benefits.

Presenters:
Denny Chan, Senior Staff Attorney, Justice in Aging
Georgia Burke, Directing Attorney, Justice in Aging

Part 1 occurs on Tuesday, July 23, 2019 11 am-12 pm PT/2-3 pm ET​

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Free Webinar: The Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB) Program—An Update for Advocates: Part 1 of 2

By | Health Care, Medicaid, Medicare, WEBINAR, Webinar Trainings

When: Tuesday, July 23, 2019 11 am-12 pm PT/2-3 pm ET

The Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB) program provides significant Medicare cost savings to low income individuals, including payment of Medicare premiums and protection from liability for any Medicare co-insurance or deductibles for health services. Those enrolled in the program also are automatically enrolled in the Part D Low Income Subsidy program (LIS). Despite its value, the QMB program is chronically under-enrolled. Many eligible individuals don’t know about the program or face barriers when they try to enroll. Those who are enrolled often face difficulties in accessing QMB protections.

This two-part webinar series gives advocates updated information on the QMB benefit and tools to use to ensure that their clients are enrolled and can use the benefit effectively.

Part One provides an overview of the QMB program, including eligibility criteria and program basics and focus on the specifics of QMB billing protections. We focus on recent improvements that make it easier for QMBs and their advocates to understand their payment responsibilities and the tools available to address problems with providers who improperly bill QMBs. We also distinguish between the QMB program and a Medicaid agency’s Part B buy-in agreement, and discuss QMB issues in Medicare Advantage.

Part Two will focus on enrollment. It will look at barriers to QMB enrollment, including problems that have arisen in various states and advocacy approaches, especially for individuals with Medicaid linked to Supplemental Security Income. We will explore both ways to untangle individual problems and ways to work with your state to improve QMB enrollment systemically.

Who should participate:
Aging and legal advocates, community-based providers and others who counsel older adults on health benefits.

Presenters:
Denny Chan, Senior Staff Attorney, Justice in Aging
Georgia Burke, Directing Attorney, Justice in Aging

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DOWNLOAD THE POWERPOINT

Issue Brief: D-SNP Look-Alikes – A Primer

By | DUAL ELIGIBLES, ISSUE BRIEF, Medicaid, Medicare, REPORTS

More dual eligibles—individuals with Medicare and Medicaid—are enrolling in a certain type of Medicare Advantage plan as a result of aggressive marketing efforts targeting dual eligibles. This type of plan, known as a Dual Eligible Special Need Plan (D-SNP) Look-Alike, threatens to undermine promising advancements in integrated care for duals made possible by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). D-SNP look-alikes are not subject to the regulations governing D-SNPs and therefore have no responsibility to coordinate Medicare and Medicaid benefits. Because they are marketed aggressively almost exclusively to duals, they draw dual eligibles away from coordinated options and place responsibility on the consumer to navigate two separate delivery systems, potentially exacerbating disruptions and gaps in care.

Justice in Aging created this issue brief, Dual Eligible Special Need Plan Look-Alikes – A Primer, to help educate advocates working with dual eligibles about the impact of these plans on dual eligibles and to request that advocates report experiences with D-SNP look-alikes to Justice in Aging and CMS.

This new issue brief:

  • Outlines some key requirements of D-SNPs;
  • identifies the basic characteristics of D-SNP look-alikes;
  • discusses problems look-alikes are causing for dual eligibles; and
  • proposes ways to restrict them in the Medicare market.

Issue Brief: 10 Year Check-Up: The Affordable Care Act Has Enhanced Access to Quality Health Care for Low-Income Older Adults

By | Health Care, ISSUE BRIEF, Language Access, Medicaid, Medicare, Nursing Homes, REPORTS

As the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit prepares to decide the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) this week, it’s time for a check-up on how the law has expanded affordable coverage for low-income older adults. Our new issue brief, 10 Year Check-Up: The Affordable Care Act Has Enhanced Access to Quality Health Care for Low-Income Older Adults, discusses all the ways this landmark legislation has improved the health and economic security of older adults. The brief also discusses how the ACA has become so ingrained in the overall health system, that without the law, the system itself would collapse.

The issue brief provides a detailed look at how the ACA has expanded affordable coverage through Medicaid to more people and made it possible for more older adults to age at home and in their communities instead of in nursing facilities. Under the ACA, older adults also are protected against being charged more for pre-existing conditions and being denied essential health benefits. Low-income older adults who receive both Medicaid and Medicare get better care coordination and more help with prescription drugs. Additionally, the ACA expanded Civil Rights protections for LGBTQ and limited English proficient seniors, and stepped up oversight of nursing facilities, among other protections.

This paper shows how, after 10 years, the ACA is woven deeply into every health care program on which older adults rely. Without it, more older adults would lose their coverage, pay more for premiums and prescription drugs, be at greater risk of institutionalization, and lose many ground-breaking consumer protections. We must continue to work together to strengthen and protect this foundational program.