Category

Long Term Care

California’s Master Plan For Aging: Prevent and End Elder Abuse in California

By | FACT SHEET, Long Term Care, Nursing Homes, REPORTS

California has committed to developing a Master Plan for Aging in order to meet the needs of older adults today and for generations to come.

The fourth in this series of papers, Prevent and End Elder Abuse in California, offers specific policy recommendations, including improved data collection and sharing, increased cooperation among government entities, simpler advance planning, and establishing robust consumer protections—all of which work together to prevent elder abuse. We are grateful to partners at the California Elder Justice Coalition, with whom we worked to develop these recommendations.

What Seniors Need To Know About Trump’s 2021 Federal Budget

By | Affordable Care Act, IN THE NEWS, Long Term Care, Medicaid, Safety Net Defense, SENIOR POVERTY, Social Security

Forbes: What Seniors Need To Know About Trump’s 2021 Federal Budget (February 10, 2020)

President Trump’s proposed 2021 Federal Budget would cause serious harm to low income older adults. The budget proposal includes cuts to critical programs that serve low income older adults, including Social Security Disability Insurance, Medicare, and Medicaid. The budget would also cut funds to federal grant programs that would impact Meals on Wheels, utilities assistance, senior job programs, and legal aid for seniors. “This budget demonstrates the lack of commitment to the safety, security and needs of older adults in our community,” said Kevin Prindiville, Justice in Aging’s Executive Director.

California’s Master Plan For Aging: Increase Income for Seniors and People with Disabilities who Receive SSI/SSP

By | FACT SHEET, Long Term Care, REPORTS, SENIOR POVERTY, Supplemental Security Income, Toolkit

California has committed to developing a Master Plan for Aging in order to meet the needs of older adults today and for generations to come.

The second of the Master Plan for Aging series of papers, Increase Income for Seniors and People with Disabilities who Receive SSI/SSP, offers three specific policy recommendations for addressing the rising income inequality leading to a lack of retirement security, and for addressing the recession-era cuts that pushed SSI recipients below the poverty line.

California’s Master Plan For Aging: Make Medi-Cal More Affordable

By | FACT SHEET, Long Term Care, Medicaid, Toolkit

California has committed to developing a Master Plan for Aging in order to meet the needs of older adults today and for generations to come. Justice in Aging will release a series of short papers containing specific policy recommendations, developed with partners, that the Master Plan for Aging must include to meet its goals to advance equity, increase economic security and safety, and improve access to quality, affordable health care and LTSS programs.

The first in this series of papers, Make Medi-Cal More Accessible and Affordable, offers eight specific policy recommendations for improving Medi-Cal in order to ensure that every low-income older adult in California is able to access high quality, affordable health care. This paper was developed with developed with partners at Disability Rights California and Western Center on Law & Poverty.

 

DOJ Crackdown on Nursing Homes to Include Criminal Counts

By | IN THE NEWS, Long Term Care, Nursing Homes

Bloomberg Law: DOJ Crackdown on Nursing Homes to Include Criminal Counts (September 30, 2019)

The Department of Justice is pushing to bring criminal charges against nursing facilities and staff accused of harming residents, alongside civil charges. Justice in Aging attorney, Eric Carlson, was interviewed for this story, in which he applauded the agency’s intent to aggressively prosecute criminal violations, stating that poor quality care and inadequate staffing levels in nursing facilities can lead to serious, and common, issues like bed sores, infection, and malnutrition.

Nursing Care Crunch Puts the Onus on Patients to Expose Problems

By | IN THE NEWS, Long Term Care, Newsroom, Nursing Homes

KALW: Nursing Care Crunch Puts the Onus on Patients to Expose Problems (September 18, 2019)

Not only is there a shortage of facilities that offer nursing care, but there is insufficient oversight by state and federal regulators. While cases of extreme abuse make headlines, unsafe conditions, inadequate staffing levels, poor training, and wrongful discharges are common problems. With lack of oversight from regulators, the task of raising these issues often falls on the nursing facility residents themselves. Justice in Aging attorney, Eric Carlson, was quoted extensively in this story. Eric recommends that residents do speak out, but also believes oversight bodies like the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and state regulators need to put patients, not operators, first.

Issue Brief & Fact Sheet: What’s at Stake for Older Adults When States Eliminate Retroactive Medicaid Coverage?

By | Affordable Care Act, FACT SHEET, Health Care, ISSUE BRIEF, Long Term Care, Medicaid

Retroactive Medicaid coverage is a key financial protection that helps older adults and others who develop sudden illnesses or long term care needs access the care they need right away. It is a smart policy intended to protect low-income people from crushing medical debt in instances where they need emergency medical or long-term care and cannot apply for Medicaid immediately. But several states are eliminating this protection through Medicaid demonstration waivers approved by the federal government.

A new Justice in Aging issue brief—Medicaid Retroactive Coverage: What’s at Stake for Older Adults When States Eliminate This Protection?—discusses typical situations that cause older adults to need Medicaid retroactive coverage, and how the policy helps them access care, while protecting them from financial hardship. The issue brief also delves into how states are using waivers to eliminate this coverage, which states are doing so, and how older adults, their families, and health care providers are harmed when the coverage is eliminated. A companion fact sheet provides a higher level view of the issue.

 

Is your loved one in a nursing home? Here’s why you should be alarmed

By | ASSISTED LIVING, IN THE NEWS, Long Term Care, Nursing Homes

Los Angeles Times: Is your loved one in a nursing home? Here’s why you should be alarmed (June 11, 2019)

A congressional report publicly identified the names of nearly 400 nursing homes cited for substandard care. Prior to the report, the nursing home names had not been disclosed. Nursing home residents suffered conditions ranging from neglect, physical abuse, sexual assault to premature death. Justice in Aging’s Directing Attorney Eric Carlson said,” You’d like to think you could expect high-quality care, but that’s not the case. People should be worried — not sky-is-falling worried, but I-need-to-do-my-homework worried. You can’t take anything for granted.” The full list can be seen here.

Why The Possibility Of TennCare Converting To A Block Grant Has Opponents Growing Worried

By | IN THE NEWS, Long Term Care, Medicaid

Nashville Public Radio: Why The Possibility Of TennCare Converting To A Block Grant Has Opponents Growing Worried (March 13, 2019)

Health care advocates worry that Tennessee will be one of the first states to seek a block grant for its Medicaid program. A block grant is a lump sum that would allow the state greater flexibility in spending federal money. However it is capped and would not increase even if the Medicaid population grew. Currently, the federal government pays for two-thirds of the expenses of Tennessee’s 1.3 million beneficiaries.

“It would be a radical, catastrophic change to Medicaid,” said Justice in Aging’s Directing Attorney Eric Carlson. “The problem with the block grant is you eliminate everything… you’re eliminating all these protections. You’re locking down the revenue at a level that almost assuredly is insufficient.”

More older residents on Medicaid wait list in Florida than any other state, attorney says

By | Health Care, Home & Community Based Services, IN THE NEWS, In-Home Supportive Services, LITIGATION, Long Term Care, Medicaid

Florida Record: More older residents on Medicaid wait list in Florida than any other state, attorney says (January 7, 2019)

A lawsuit has been filed against the state of Florida over extremely long wait time in accessing in-home Medicaid care. Justice in Aging, along with Disability Rights Florida and the Southern Legal Counsel, is representing the six plaintiffs currently suing the state.

“According to national statistics, there are more older adults and adults with disabilities on the wait list for community-based services in Florida than any other state,” Regan Bailey, litigation director for Justice in Aging. “The failure to provide long-term care places people at risk of unnecessarily entering a nursing facility just to get the care they need which should be provided at home.” Read the full article.