Category

Health Disparities

Older Adults and People with Disabilities Challenge Discriminatory Surge Care Guidelines in COVID-19 Hotspots Arizona and Texas

By | Health Care, Health Disparities, Health Equity, PRESS RELEASE

July 20, 2020

In states that are hard hit by COVID-19 surges, older adults, people with disabilities, and people of color face a real risk of being denied life-saving medical care during the pandemic. This week, individuals represented by a coalition of state and national disability and civil rights advocacy groups filed complaints with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Civil Rights (OCR) challenging the crisis standard of care plans in Arizona and Texas, two states hit hard by the COVID-19 pandemic.

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California Sets New Rules for Rationing Medical Equipment if Hospitals Run Out During Pandemic

By | Health Disparities, Health Equity, IN THE NEWS

Sacramento Bee: California Sets New Rules for Rationing Medical Equipment if Hospitals Run Out During Pandemic (June 12, 2020)

The California Department of Public Health has a new plan for that worst-case scenario. On June 9, the CDPH released new pandemic crisis care guidelines, after more than 60 community and advocacy organizations representing millions of Californians objected to the first set of guidelines the department released in April. “We are pleased that California rejected ageist, ableist, and racist approaches for triaging care that have emerged from other states during this crisis,” said Kevin Prindiville, executive director of Justice in Aging. “Instead, California has taken an approach that values the lives and rights of older adults and people with disabilities from diverse backgrounds.”

Aging and Older Adults in the Time of COVID-19

By | Health Care Defense, Health Disparities, Health Equity, IN THE NEWS, Medicaid, Nursing Homes, SENIOR POVERTY

Peace and Social Justice Radio Show: Aging and Older Adults in the Time of COVID-19 (June 5, 2020)

Justice in Aging Senior Staff Attorney Claire Ramsey was a featured guest on the show. She spoke about COVID-19 and older adults in California, particularly the impact on older adults of color. She also talked about how devastating the proposed budget cuts to programs low-income older adults rely on to stay safe during a pandemic. Claire’s segment starts at the 1 hour mark.

Rethinking How America Cares for its Elderly

By | Health Disparities, Health Equity, Home & Community Based Services, IN THE NEWS, Medicaid, Medicare

Street Roots: Rethinking How America Cares for its Elderly (May 26, 2020)

Before COVID-19 sent the United States hurdling toward a devastating economic recession, 37 million adults aged 50 and older were already living in poverty — with another 10 million on the brink. Like it has with so many other social issues in the U.S., the coronavirus pandemic has illuminated the economic hardship and isolation facing many of our nation’s senior citizens, and the lack of value placed on the people who care for them. Executive Director Kevin Prindiville was interviewed for this article. “We’ve underinvested in our Medicaid programs and long-term care programs that help people stay home and in their community, which leaves many families with the only option to move an older family member into an institution,” Prindiville said.

Op-Ed: Revised Budget Puts Older Californians, Communities at Risk

By | Health Disparities, Health Equity, IN THE NEWS, Medicare

Cal Matters: Op-Ed: Revised Budget Puts Older Californians, Communities at Risk (May 26, 2020)

During a public health crisis like this, few things are more important than making sure people can access health care. But somehow in the budget revision, it’s health care that gets the biggest cut; and not just health care for anyone – it cuts health programs that older adults with low incomes rely on. Older Californians are not expendable. They are vital members of our families and communities who built a state strong enough to weather this storm. The governor and the Legislature need to come up with a final budget that respects and protects them. This op-ed was co-authored by Claire Ramsey, Senior Staff Attorney at Justice in Aging, and Linda Nguy, Health Policy Advocate at Western Center on Law & Poverty

California Seniors are Worried About These Cuts in Gavin Newsom’s New Budget. Here’s Why

By | Health Disparities, Health Equity, IN THE NEWS, Medicaid, Newsroom

Sacramento Bee: California Seniors are Worried About These Cuts in Gavin Newsom’s New Budget. Here’s Why (May 26, 2020)

Newsom’s revised budget plan, announced earlier this month, seeks to close a projected $54.3 billion budget deficit brought on by the coronavirus pandemic. It includes about $646 million in proposed cuts that worry seniors and their advocates because they would reduce health care options and access to programs that allow elderly residents to stay at home and out of nursing homes, which have been hotbeds for COVID-19 outbreaks. Claire Ramsey, senior staff attorney at Justice in Aging, said the May budget plan in all “proposes severe and devastating cuts to the very programs that keep older adults and people with disabilities living safely in their home.”

How Newsom Budget Yanks Back Medi-Cal Health Care Gains for Low-Income Residents

By | Health Disparities, Health Equity, IN THE NEWS, Medicaid, Newsroom

Cal Matters: How Newsom Budget Yanks Back Medi-Cal Health Care Gains for Low-Income Residents (May 18, 2020)

The state’s revised budget released last week shows that the Golden State’s new economic reality will almost certainly hit the Medi-Cal program with cuts in services and provider rates, as well as rescinded expansions. The list of proposed changes is sweeping, from canceling coverage expansion to more older Californians – including undocumented seniors – to cuts in some adult dental services.

“I think there will be a huge effort within the next few weeks to see whether we can push back on this,” Ramsey said. “If we don’t get to go forward now, it will likely take years.”

Justice in Aging Statement on Opening Too Soon

By | Health Care, Health Disparities, PRESS RELEASE
Justice in Aging is calling on state and local governments to retain strong social distancing measures to protect the health and safety of older adults in our communities. Relaxing these measures now, even as new models are projecting a near doubling of daily deaths by June 1, is irresponsible and will cost the lives of tens of thousands of older adults. Though the curve is flattening in some places, it is spiking in others. The most critical fact is that the virus remains deadly all across America in every type of community and for every age group, but most especially for seniors, people with disabilities, and people of color. Read More

Justice in Aging Rejects Ruthless Utilitarian Policies that Devalue the Lives of Older Adults

By | Health Care, Health Disparities, PRESS RELEASE

At Justice in Aging we believe care must be provided without consideration of age or age-related criteria, including criteria that cannot be operationalized without using age as a proxy. Care must be based on individualized assessments that consider an individual’s prospects for recovery and allocate treatment to help the person survive rather than focusing allocation on “number of years of life” or “quality of life” factors. Read More

Llegar a la tercera edad como inmigrante, sin pensión y sin seguro médico

By | Health Care, Health Disparities, Health Equity, IN THE NEWS, Language Access, SENIOR POVERTY, Uncategorized

La Opinion: Llegar a la tercera edad como inmigrante, sin pensión y sin seguro médico, (March 28, 2020)

This article talks about how difficult it is for older adult immigrants who have no pension or health care to meet their basic needs during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially if they lost their jobs due to the pandemic. Justice in Aging attorney, Denny Chan, was interviewed for this article.

Se estima que de 2.2 millones de personas sin documentos que viven en California, el 2% son mayores de 65 años, según un informe del UC Berkeley Labor Center. “Muchos trabajadores inmigrantes han perdido su trabajo y están luchando para satisfacer sus necesidades para vivir; una catástrofe como una hospitalización de un miembro de la familia, los podrá en dificultades económicas”, agregó. “Un seguro médico protege a los estadounidenses de los costos médicos altos e inesperados, pero sin esos beneficios, las familias inmigrantes enfrentan altos riesgos de muerte y desesperación”. Denny dijo que, “en estos momentos la comunidad inmigrante, documentados o no, viven situaciones muy complicadas por las políticas antiinmigrantes por parte de la administración Trump.”