Federal Government Falls Short in Protecting Assisted Living Residents

By | PRESS RELEASE

(February 5, 2018)  A new report released today by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) reveals that lax federal oversight over Medicaid-funded assisted living services threatens the health and safety of the over 330,000 people relying on these services across the country.

The report shows that “critical incidents”, such as unexplained deaths, assault, abuse, neglect, financial exploitation, and other serious situations are not tracked and reported adequately or consistently. Additionally, there is no way for prospective residents and their families to evaluate the quality of various assisted living facilities because this information is not readily available.

Read More

Over 50 Advocacy Organizations Opposed to Congressional Tax Plan

By | News Releases

Flawed Plan Will Put Health Care for Older Adults & People with Disabilities at Risk

Washington, DC — Over 50 organizations concerned about access to affordable, high-quality health care and long-term services and supports for older adults, people with disabilities, and their families, sent letters to Congressional leaders in both the House and the Senate today in opposition to the tax bill that is likely to be voted on next week. The letters reiterate the organizations’ strong opposition to any tax bill that would put at risk both health care and long-term care for older adults and people with disabilities.

The reported effects of the tax bill would be to explode the national deficit by at least $1 trillion, and potentially much more. This tremendous revenue shortfall will inevitably put Medicaid, Medicare, Social Security and other programs at risk for massive cuts. These are programs that millions of older adults, people with disabilities, and their families rely on. For example, more than 57 million older adults and people with disabilities rely on Medicare, including 11 million low-income beneficiaries who have both Medicare and Medicaid. Read More

Justice in Aging Joins Other Civil Rights Groups in Amicus Brief Filing As SCOTUS Scrutinizes Workers’ Rights

By | PRESS RELEASE

Monday, August 21 – To protect the rights of workers, Justice in Aging teamed up last week with leading civil rights law firms, The Impact Fund, the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. (“LDF”) and Cohen Milstein, to file an amicus brief on behalf of more than thirty civil rights organizations from across the country in a trio of cases pending in the U.S. Supreme Court.

The cases address the question of whether employment agreements that prevent workers from taking “concerted” action to challenge workplace violations conflict with protections in federal labor law. Such agreements undermine the fight for civil rights.
Read More

Court Certifies Nationwide Class in “Observation Status” Case

By | Health Care, Medicare, PRESS RELEASE

Decision in Alexander v. Price Means Medicare Patients Could Gain Right to Appeal Placement on “Observation Status” and Avoid Large Medical Bills

August 1, 2017 – Eighty-four-year-old Nancy Niemi of North Carolina was hospitalized for 39 days earlier this year after her doctor sent her to the emergency room. It took weeks to stabilize her blood pressure and she experienced serious complications. But unbelievably, Ms. Niemi was categorized as an outpatient on “observation status” for her entire hospitalization, and she therefore lacked the three-day inpatient stay Medicare requires for coverage of her subsequent, very expensive care at a nursing home. Ms. Niemi’s son tried to help her challenge her lengthy placement on observation status, but Medicare does not allow beneficiaries to appeal this issue. She still owes thousands of dollars to the nursing facility. However, due to the federal court decision issued July 31, 2017, she is now a member of a nationwide class of hospital patients who may gain the right to appeal their placement on observation status.
Read More

In Reckless and Irresponsible Move, Senate Votes to Proceed on Repeal of the ACA

By | Health Care, Medicaid, PRESS RELEASE

Below is a statement by Executive Director Kevin Prindiville of Justice in Aging

Today, the Senate took a reckless and irresponsible step towards gutting healthcare for older adults and others, and removing critical consumer protections that save lives. With Vice President Pence casting the tie-breaking vote, the Senate voted to begin a curtailed 20-hour debate on several bills that would drastically change our health care system, stripping coverage from millions of Americans and cutting over $750 billion from Medicaid. Any bill that emerges from such a chaotic process would have devastating effects on older Americans and their families.
Read More

Bill in Congress Aims to Address Poverty Among Older Adults and People with Disabilities

By | PRESS RELEASE, Supplemental Security Income

Washington, DC—(July 19, 2017) 85-year-old Ortencia boils soup bones with vegetables she gets from the food bank to stretch her weekly food allotment and stay healthy. 61-year old Carey endures numerous aches and pains to carry groceries home from the bus, the cheapest form of transportation. Both struggle to survive on Supplemental Security Income (SSI), a need-based program administered by the Social Security Administration (SSA) that provides a very basic income to older adults and people with disabilities. Major provisions of the program haven’t been updated since it was created in 1972, and as the program fails to keep up with the cost of living, the 8.3 million people who rely on it to pay rent, buy food, and meet other basic needs keep falling further below the poverty line.

Representative Grijalva (D-AZ) introduced the SSI Restoration Act of 2017 in Congress today, with the support of 36 representatives and more than 80 organizations. The SSI Restoration Act puts forth solutions intended to help people like Ortencia and Carey make ends meet. The act increases the amount of money individuals can receive to supplement their income from both employment and non-employment sources; it increases the amount of assets individuals and couples can save for emergencies to a limit that’s more in line with today’s dollars; it repeals a provision that discourages people from seeking help from family; and removes the marriage penalty, among other adjustments.
Read More

CBO Score Confirms Latest ACA Repeal Bill Will Lead to Devastating Coverage Losses and Sharply Higher Premiums

By | Health Care, Medicaid, PRESS RELEASE

Below is a statement by Executive Director Kevin Prindiville on the Obamacare Repeal Reconciliation Act of 2017 (ORRA)

Today the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) confirmed what we already knew: repealing the Affordable Care Act and delaying replacement will wreak havoc on our health care system. According to the CBO’s report, the Senate’s latest bill would strip coverage from 32 million Americans and cause health insurance premiums to nearly double in the next decade.
Read More

Justice in Aging’s Statement on Senate ACA Repeal Efforts

By | Health Care, Medicaid, Medicare, PRESS RELEASE

Senate leadership has announced that they will no longer move forward with the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) of 2017. Instead, they seek to proceed to a vote to immediately repeal the Affordable Care Act, and delay replacement to a later date.

While we are relieved that the BCRA, and its unprecedented cuts to Medicaid, is off the table, repealing the ACA remains a terrible idea that would harm older adults—especially in the absence of a meaningful replacement bill.

Read More