Category

Special Report

Report: Older Women & Poverty

By | Economic Security, Health Care, Health Care Defense, Health Disparities, Health Equity, Long Term Care, Medicaid, Medicare, Nursing Homes, Oral Health, Safety Net Defense, SENIOR POVERTY, Social Security, Special Report, Supplemental Security Income

Because of structural inequities that impact women more than men, a significant percentage of older women are struggling to stay out of poverty.

There are 7.1 million older adults living in poverty in the United States, with nearly two out of three of them being women. Women like Venorica, who is working three jobs at the age of 70, and Vicky, who once ran a successful business with her husband, are struggling to stay afloat.

A new Justice in Aging report surveys the reasons more women are aging into poverty than men, discusses the support systems that are in place to help older women, and recommends ways we can strengthen and expand those support systems. The brief is accompanied by videos of women telling their own stories. Older women have cared for us and worked hard all of their lives. It’s imperative that we enact policies so they don’t have to struggle to make ends meet.

READ THE REPORT
WATCH THE VIDEOS HERE

Prevent and End Homelessness Among Older Adults

By | REPORTS, Special Report

More older adults are homeless or at risk of homelessness than at any time in recent history. As the population ages, more adults are aging into poverty. The lack of affordable housing and higher costs for health care and other necessities are also leaving greater numbers of older adults at risk of poverty and homelessness, and systemic economic problems are contributing to the problem.

A Special Report by Justice in Aging, How to Prevent and End Homelessness Among Older Adults, created in partnership with The National Alliance to End Homelessness, outlines the problem and recommends policy solutions that can be put in place now to ensure that all older adults have a safe place to age in dignity, with affordable health care, and sufficient income to meet their basic needs.

Read the paper and watch the accompanying video about Bill, a 67 year-old Oakland, CA resident who has struggled with homelessness. Please share the report with other advocates in your network by forwarding this email or sharing through social media.

Special Report: Strengthening Supports for Low-Income Older Adults and Caregivers

By | REPORTS, Special Report
Margaret is a mom with two teenagers at home, a husband, and a full time job. Her mother Sadie lives alone on a limited income in an adjacent town. Margaret checks in on her every day, and is always on call for transportation to doctor’s appointments, help with bills, and groceries. Margaret is a family caregiver, one of nearly 35 million Americans providing unpaid care to an older adult.

A new paper by Justice in Aging, Advocacy Starts at Home: Strengthening Supports for Low-Income Older Adults and Caregivers, and accompanying video outline the challenges Margaret faces in helping her mother age safely at home in dignity.

As the population ages and the prevalence of cognitive disorders among older adults increases, policymakers and the media are paying more attention to the challenges of caregiving. These challenges are even more acute for low-income older adults and their families.

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New 50 State Survey of Dementia Training Requirements

By | REPORTS, Special Report, Toolkit
With more than 5 million people living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias, there’s a growing need for robust training standards for health care professionals in the special needs of people with cognitive impairment. For example, though 64% of nursing home residents have dementia, only 23 states have laws prescribing training requirements for direct care staff in nursing homes and, of those, only one state requires staff to pass competency examinations. Only ten states require dementia training for law enforcement.

These are among the findings of an in-depth 50-state survey of statutes and regulations that Justice in Aging conducted with the support of the Alzheimer’s Association. We looked at dementia training requirements for professionals in a variety of health care and community settings and found wide variation among states in both the amount and the content of required training. We compiled our findings in a five-paper series, Training to Serve People with Dementia: Is our Health Care System Ready?

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