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IN THE NEWS

Advocates Seek Medically Necessary Oral Health Care, CMS Eyes Issue

By | IN THE NEWS

Inside Health Policy January 29, 2019
This story leads with the news that CMS is taking a look at medically necessary dental benefits for Medicare beneficiaries. The article then goes on to describe advocate efforts (including Justice in Aging) to push for an inclusion of oral health benefits in Medicare Part B.  The article also mentions Justice in Aging’s brief on including an oral health benefit in Medicare as well as a bill that Senator Ben Cardin introduced to provide an oral health benefit. The article is behind a paywall. This is a summary.

Florida Faces ADA Lawsuit Over Medicaid HCBS Wait List

By | IN THE NEWS, Uncategorized

Open Minds: Florida Faces ADA Lawsuit Over Medicaid HCBS Wait List (January 27, 2019)
This health care trade publication article summarized our complaint in the case Alexander et al., v. Florida Agency for Health Care Administration, including the key facts of the case and noted Florida’s lack of an Olmstead Plan to guide the delivery of services for class members in the least restrictive placement to meet their needs. The article is behind a paywall that can be accessed by members here.

 

 

Cardin, Neal Express Interest in Medicare Oral Health Coverage

By | IN THE NEWS

Inside Health Policy: Cardin, Neal Express Interest in Medicare Oral Health Coverage (January 14, 2019)

Oral health is critical to overall health, yet, fewer than half of older adults have access to oral health care in a given year. In 2018, Justice in Aging contributed to a white paper released by Oral Health America. In the white paper, we discussed how incorporating an oral health benefit into Medicare Part B could expand access to oral health care to older adults.

On January 4, 2019, Senator Ben Cardin (D-MD) introduced legislation to add oral health to Medicare Part B. Justice in Aging Deputy Director, Jennifer Goldberg, was quoted in the article saying that stakeholder support is coalescing behind adding an oral health benefit to Medicare Part B. The article is available online only to subscribers of Inside Health Policy. This is a summary.

Florida Faces ADA Lawsuit Over Medicaid Wait List

By | Health Care, IN THE NEWS, In-Home Supportive Services, LITIGATION, Long Term Care, Medicaid, Person-Centered Care Planning, SENIOR POVERTY

WJCT News/WUSF Health: Florida Faces ADA Lawsuit Over Medicaid Wait List (January 2, 2019)

Justice in Aging has filed a class action lawsuit against Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration. Currently, older adults and people with disabilities could wait up to 3.5 years to access in-home health care. Justice in Aging wants Florida to develop more in-home care services for people and increase the capacity of the services it has. Litigation Director Regan Bailey said “it’s a need that’s growing. And the way to meet that need is to provide more community-based services because you can serve many more people for the same money in the community versus in a nursing facility.”

The Truth About Older Consumers: Household Budgets

By | IN THE NEWS

Stria: The Truth About Older Consumers: Household Budgets (November 26, 2018)

This piece challenges some of the “successful aging” narratives about older adults that are common in U.S. media. The author explores some of the different expenses older adults encounter (such as higher health care costs) that make them vulnerable. The author also acknowledges that many older adults start out as poor, and aging makes them poorer, and that some older adults, such as LGBT older adults, are more likely to age into poverty. The author interviewed Justice in Aging Executive Director, Kevin Prindiville, for insight into senior poverty, who said, “The cost of housing and health care keeps rising. Pensions are smaller than had been promised and some have disappeared altogether. Social Security is a bedrock, keeping 15 million older people out of poverty—but just barely. We have not strengthened or expanded Social Security and it’s not keeping up.” Read the full article.

California’s Senior Population is Growing Faster than any other Age Group. How the Next Governor Responds is Crucial

By | IN THE NEWS, Newsroom, SENIOR POVERTY

Los Angeles Times: California’s Senior Population is Growing Faster than any other Age Group. How the Next Governor Responds is Crucial ( October 7, 2018)
The next governor will be confronted with a demographic shift of epic proportions: Seniors will be California’s fastest-growing population. Between now and 2026, the number of Californians 65 and older is expected to climb by 2.1 million, according to projections by the state Department of Finance. By contrast, the number of 25- to 64-year-olds is projected to grow by just more than half a million; the number of Californians younger than 25 will grow by a mere 2,500. The reporter interviewed Justice in Aging Executive Director, Kevin Prindiville, at length for the article. The Justice in Aging perspective on senior poverty was well reflected in the fact that the journalist noted that the state is going to have to grapple with poverty in a different way, due to the unique needs of seniors aging in poverty. Kevin notes, “We get a lot of pressure to come with ideas that don’t have a dollar ask, but we’re going to have to spend some money to solve these bigger problems.” Read the full article.

Older Immigrants’ Access to Basic Needs Programs is at Risk

By | IN THE NEWS, NEWS, Newsroom, SENIOR POVERTY

Dailyjournal.com. Older Immigrants’ Access to Basic Needs Programs at Risk

By Justice in Aging Attorneys Denny Chan and Natalie Keen
When Mary immigrated to San Francisco from the Philippines over 30 years ago, she long dreamed of growing old here surrounded by her children and grandchildren. That dream appeared to be coming true when she happily retired last year at the age of 70, knowing that the process was already underway to welcome her son and his family, currently based in Manila, to join her in California – they had already been waiting for many years.

Unfortunately, however, Mary’s dream would be jeopardized if the Trump Administration succeeds in changing the longstanding “public charge” policy. Read The Full Article.

 

How to Access Care for a Senior Who Doesn’t Speak English

By | Health Care, Health Equity, IN THE NEWS, NEWS

Caring.com: How to Access Care for a Senior Who Doesn’t Speak English (Aug. 2, 2018) For older adults who don’t speak English, accessing the health care they need can be difficult. However, seniors have the legal right to interpretation and translation services from health care providers that receive federal dollars through a provision of the Affordable Care Act. The problem is, seniors often do not know they have this right or how to exercise it. Justice in Aging attorney, Denny Chan lays out for this article what rights LEP seniors have, while the adult day care provider, On Lok Lifeways offers an good illustration of what culturally competent care for seniors with limited English can look like. “It’s an anxious time for people who don’t speak English as their primary language because there’s been a number of efforts to chip away at the protections they have,” said Chan. Read the full article.