Category

Economic Security

WEBINAR: Advanced Webinar- Understanding the SSI Transfer Penalty

By | Economic Security, Supplemental Security Income, WEBINAR

When: Thursday, June 28, 2018 at 11:00 a.m. PT / 2:00 p.m. ET.

The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program has many complicated financial eligibility rules, including the treatment of resources or assets. Applicants and recipients cannot simply give away countable assets to gain eligibility for SSI. Similarly they cannot decline assets that they are entitled to receive, such as inheritances, to establish or maintain their eligibility. An SSI applicant or recipient who transfers an asset for less than fair market value or declines to receive an asset could be subject to the transfer of asset penalty, becoming ineligible for SSI benefits for up to 36 months.

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In-Kind Support and Maintenance in the SSI Program

By | Economic Security, REPORTS, Supplemental Security Income

Why do some individuals receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits only receive $500 a month instead of $750? In many cases, the reason is “in-kind support and maintenance” (ISM).

As SSI is a means-tested program, applicants and recipients must meet several financial eligibility criteria on an ongoing basis. The income and resource rules, including in-kind support and maintenance, are particularly complicated. These rules can cause significant hardship for low-income people trying to survive on SSI.

This new guide, In-Kind Support and Maintenance in the SSI Program, gives advocates tools to successfully navigate ISM on behalf of their clients. They can make a big difference by making sure that clients can maximize their SSI benefits to better meet their needs for shelter, food, health care, and other necessities.

Read the guide, and watch the recording of today’s webinar on In-Kind Support and Maintenance here.

SSI 101: A Guide for Advocates

By | Advocate's Guide, Economic Security, ISSUE BRIEF, Supplemental Security Income

Supplemental Security Income (SSI)—a need-based program administered by the Social Security Administration – provides a very basic income to over 8.2 million people, including 2.2 million seniors age 65+. As more seniors struggle to make ends meet in today’s economy, getting access to SSI can help low-income seniors escape deep poverty and avoid or move out of homelessness. Justice in Aging’s Supplemental Security Income 101: A Guide for Advocates introduces advocates and individuals who provide assistance to older adults to the SSI program and focuses on the basics of the program for those who qualify based on age (65 years or older).

Released today, the Guide includes:

  • A description of the SSI program and benefits
  • An overview of the application and appeals processes
  • A discussion of key eligibility criteria, including examples

And in case you missed our SSI Basics webinar last month, the video is now available.

Justice in Aging’s Statement on Senate Tax Bill

By | Economic Security, Health Care, NEWS, Statements

Last night the Senate passed a tax bill that will take health care away from 13 million Americans including older adults and people with disabilities. Further, it will severely impact the economic security of millions of older Americans and people with preexisting conditions—all for the benefit of the wealthiest 1% of Americans and large corporations.

This tax bill, if passed as is by the House, will explode the deficit by at least a trillion dollars, leading these same Republicans to carry out their calls for massive cuts in Medicaid, Medicare, Social Security, and other critical programs that older adults and their families need, while offering little to no tax relief for struggling low and middle income families.

The Joint Committee on Taxation estimates that even considering economic growth, this bill will cut revenue by $1 trillion. This will force immediate cuts to Medicare and other programs under sequestration. The CBO projects cuts of $25 billion to Medicare in 2018 alone.

The repeal of the individual mandate will cause premiums to spike for those with preexisting conditions, especially impacting older adults age 55-64 who are enrolled in health insurance through the Affordable Care Act. Many will not be able to afford health care. An estimated 13 million Americans will lose their health care, including 5 million people who would not get Medicaid even though they qualify.

This full-fledged attack on people who are already struggling is unconscionable and will cause lasting harm not only to today’s seniors, but to tomorrows’ seniors as well. This includes our grandparents, our parents, ourselves, and our own children.

We call on the House to halt this rushed process, and urge Congress to start over to ensure that any changes to the tax code will not drive up deficits or reduce access to health care for older adults, people with disabilities, and their families.

Talking Taxes Over Turkey

By | Affordable Care Act, BLOG, Economic Security, Health Care, Long Term Care, Medicaid, Medicare, Safety Net Defense
This week marks an important milestone for my wife and me – our first time hosting Thanksgiving. We’ll be bringing together three generations of family: our parents and some of their siblings, our siblings, and a growing crew of little ones. There will be good food, lots of laughs and, if my nephews can convince my daughters, some family football. Read More

What Advocates for Older Adults Need to Know About the Budget Resolution

By | Affordable Care Act, BLOG, Economic Security, Safety Net Defense
If you work with older adults (or have older adults in your life), you have a sense of what we all need as we age. The burden of high health care and housing costs on low-income seniors is growing, and fewer seniors can meet these basic needs: hot meals and enough food to eat, a stable home in the community, and quality health care. Unfortunately, Senate Republicans passed a budget resolution that would make this vision of aging more and more rare. The budget resolution would allow Congress to significantly cut taxes for the wealthiest Americans by cutting funding for critical programs needed by all other Americans. Here’s what advocates for older adults need to know. Read More