All Posts By

Vanessa Barrington

Older Immigrants’ Access to Basic Needs Programs is at Risk

By | IN THE NEWS, NEWS, Newsroom, SENIOR POVERTY

Dailyjournal.com. Older Immigrants’ Access to Basic Needs Programs at Risk

By Justice in Aging Attorneys Denny Chan and Natalie Keen
When Mary immigrated to San Francisco from the Philippines over 30 years ago, she long dreamed of growing old here surrounded by her children and grandchildren. That dream appeared to be coming true when she happily retired last year at the age of 70, knowing that the process was already underway to welcome her son and his family, currently based in Manila, to join her in California – they had already been waiting for many years.

Unfortunately, however, Mary’s dream would be jeopardized if the Trump Administration succeeds in changing the longstanding “public charge” policy. Read The Full Article.

 

Advocate Guide: Accessibility in Medicaid Managed Care

By | Advocate's Guide, Health Care, Medicaid, mltss

States require managed care plans who serve Medicaid enrollees to establish and maintain an internal grievance and appeal and fair hearing system. As states begin to incorporate new federal regulations into their Medicaid rules, there’s opportunity for advocates to help shape those rules to ensure that older adults and people with disabilities have equal access to the grievance and appeal and state fair hearing systems, as mandated by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (“Rehab Act”), the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), and Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”).

Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund (DREDF), Justice in Aging and National Health Law Program (NHeLP) collaborated on a new Advocates Guide to Accessibility in Medicaid Managed Care Grievances, Appeals, and State Fair Hearing. This new Advocates’ Guide, provides guidance on how the federal framework can be made fully accessible to Medicaid beneficiaries who are older and/or have disabilities.

Links to three accessible versions of the guide can be found below.

 

White Paper: An Oral Health Benefit in Medicare Part B: It’s Time to Include Oral Health in Health Care

By | Health Equity, ISSUE BRIEF, Medicare, Oral Health

Oral health is an integral part of overall health. Oral health problems can adversely affect one’s ability to maintain optimal nutrition, self-image, social interactions, and mental and physical health. Oral health problems can lead to chronic pain, tooth loss and serious infections. Poor oral health can even worsen chronic medical conditions such as heart disease and diabetes.

Older adults need timely and affordable access to dental care in order to maintain their health and well-being, yet, there is currently no mechanism for most older adults to access care. Contrary to what many believe, Medicare does not include an oral health benefit. Most older adults cannot afford to purchase private oral health insurance or pay out-of-pocket for the care they need. As a result, 70 percent of Medicare recipients have limited or no dental coverage, and fewer than half see a dentist each year.

A new White Paper, An Oral Health Benefits in Medicare Part B: It’s Time to Include Oral Health in Health Care discusses how a Medicare Part B dental benefit would close disparities in dental use and expense between the uninsured and insured and among older adults with few financial resources and limited oral health education. The paper also details how such a benefit could be structured and the legislative changes that would need to happen before such a benefit could be established.

Justice in Aging’s Statement on the Nomination of Judge Kavanaugh

By | IN THE NEWS, Newsroom, Statements

The stakes are high for older adults with the nomination of the next Supreme Court Justice. We need a Supreme Court Justice who will protect older adults’ access to health care, their economic security, and their right to be treated equally and with dignity in their homes, workplaces, and communities. Congress needs to reject any nominee, including Judge Kavanaugh, who will put the interests of the wealthy and powerful above the interests of the rest of us—especially the older adults in our communities. The American people want a Supreme Court justice with moderate views and who has bipartisan support. Judge Kavanaugh is not such a justice.

Judge Kavanaugh’s record gives us little comfort that he would defend the civil rights of older adults or older adults’ access to health care. He has routinely ruled against older adults in age discrimination cases. The fate of the Affordable Care Act and the consumer protections that are critical to the ability of older adults to access and afford coverage are on the line. Based on Judge Kavanaugh’s record, his confirmation would put protections for 130 million Americans with pre-existing conditions at grave risk.

His willingness to defer to the executive authority of the President is dangerous and would undermine the judiciary’s role as a check on unfettered Presidential power. The Administration is rolling back important consumer protections and rights, including for LGBTQ older adults, and cutting access to Medicaid. The next Supreme Court Justice should be someone who will preserve the court system as a meaningful route to challenge these actions, not someone who would turn back the clock on civil rights

For those reasons we oppose Judge Kavanaugh’s nomination and urge members of Congress to reject him as a nominee. 

Justice in Aging’s Statement on the Trump Administration’s Immigration Policies

By | Newsroom, Statements

Justice in Aging opposes the Administration’s continued attacks on immigrant families, as demonstrated in the recent statements and policy actions of numerous Administration officials and agencies. These statements and actions – including the separation or indefinite detention of families – are inhumane, unethical and contrary to our country’s values.

As advocates for older adults, we support policies that welcome and help immigrants in our communities. Many immigrants are older adults. Data from the 2015 census show that 15% of the population 60 years old and older were born outside the United States. Furthermore, many older adults belong to multigenerational families with immigrant adults and immigrant children. Older adults in these families may both rely on other family members to care for them, and provide childcare so other family members can work. The Administration’s choice to misuse our nation’s immigration policies to attack immigrants and their families causes serious and irreparable harm and fails to serve anyone.

In addition, an increasing share of paid caregivers for older adults are immigrants, and many of the immigrant direct care work force are themselves over age 55. As the needs of our aging communities grow over the next ten years, we will increasingly rely on immigrants to provide even more care. Our communities also benefit from the contributions of younger immigrant workers, who pay into Social Security and Medicare for decades, thereby strengthening the financing of these programs for us all.

Instead of attacking immigrants who come here to escape dangerous conditions at home or simply to seek a better life, as millions have done since the founding of the United States, we need to recognize the important connections between immigration and the well-being of all older adults in our communities and advance policies that support immigrants and their families

Finding Housing When Mom Doesn’t Speak English

By | IN THE NEWS

Next Avenue: Finding Housing When Mom Doesn’t Speak English, (May 8, 2018) It’s not easy for anyone to be uprooted from a home and for an older adult with minimal or no English, it can be especially challenging. But, for consumers, planning ahead, researching your rights and stepping in to assist can help create the best outcome. Justice in Aging attorney, Denny Chan offers advice on how family members can learn their rights and help limited English proficient loved ones receive person-centered, culturally competent care throughout this piece.

Are Uber and Lyft Ready for Medicare?

By | IN THE NEWS

Bloomberg Health: Are Uber and Lyft Ready for Medicare? (April 24, 2018) App-enabled ride-sharing companies like Uber and Lyft are eager to work with Medicare plans, which could fund transportation as a supplemental benefit to enrollees. In this piece on the Bloomberg Health blog that summarizes a longer piece on the outlet’s paid platform, Justice in Aging attorney Georgia Burke cautions that drivers would need training in order to help older adults and people with disabilities who need door-to-door service.

Assisted Living: A $10 Billion Industry with Little Oversight

By | IN THE NEWS

Governing Magazine: Assisted Living: A $10 Billion Industry with Little Oversight (April 2018) A February report from the Government Accountability Office (GAO), which found significant shortcomings in oversight of assisted living facilities across the country. It found significant shortcomings in oversight of assisted living facilities across the country, but “barely scratches the surface” of the problem, said Eric Carlson when interviewed for the piece.

Wheelchairs Prohibited in the Last Place You’d Expect

By | IN THE NEWS

The New York Times: Wheelchairs Prohibited in the Last Place You’d Expect (April 30, 2018) A lawsuit was filed in New York against a number of assisted living facilities for  discrimination against people in wheelchairs and for violating the Fair Housing Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act and other federal laws. The facilities had all been found denying potential residents because they use wheelchairs. Part of the problem is that assisted living facilities are mainly regulated by the states, and many state laws are out of date and do not comply with federal non-discrimination law. Justice in Aging attorney Eric Carlson noted for the article that the percentage of assisted living facilities covered by Medicaid is growing.