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Kevin Prindiville

Talking Taxes Over Turkey

By | Affordable Care Act, BLOG, Economic Security, Health Care, Long Term Care, Medicaid, Medicare, Safety Net Defense | No Comments
This week marks an important milestone for my wife and me – our first time hosting Thanksgiving. We’ll be bringing together three generations of family: our parents and some of their siblings, our siblings, and a growing crew of little ones. There will be good food, lots of laughs and, if my nephews can convince my daughters, some family football. Read More

Justice in Aging’s Statement on the House Passage of the Tax Bill

By | Affordable Care Act, Health Care, Health Care Defense, Medicaid, Medicare, Social Security, Statements, Supplemental Security Income | No Comments

Today, the House of Representatives passed a tax bill that is a full-fledged attack on the health and well-being of older Americans and their families.

As we’ve discussed, this is all part of the House Republican leadership’s two-step process. Step one is to cut taxes for the wealthy and drive up the deficit by $1.5 trillion. Step two is to use the higher deficit to justify additional future cuts to programs we all depend on, such as Medicare and Medicaid, Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Older American Act programs, and many others.

The inevitable program cuts that Republican leadership will push for, after they balloon the deficit, will cause lasting harm to seniors today and in the future. Further, the House bill passed today eliminates the medical expense tax deduction that provides tax relief to millions of older adults with high out-of-pocket and long-term care costs and modest incomes.

This bill overwhelmingly benefits the wealthiest Americans and big corporations at the expense of everyone else. We urge the Senate to stop this reckless process and reject any bill that drives up the deficit and takes away health care from older Americans and their families.

Unnatural Disaster: Seniors Hit Hardest in Floods and Fires

By | BLOG, Health Care, Medicaid, Medicare, Nursing Homes | No Comments
The heartbreaking stories from our recent spate of natural disasters just keep coming. The hurricanes in Houston, Florida and Puerto Rico; the wildfires in Northern California. Stories of destruction, panic, fear and – sadly – death. And there is one disturbing through line: the victims of these disasters, especially those who lose their lives, are overwhelmingly older adults. Read More

Social Security 2100 Act a Commonsense Approach to Achieve Solvency, Pay Adequate Benefits

By | BLOG, HOMEPAGE, Social Security | No Comments
When President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act into law in 1935, poverty among older Americans stood at more than 50%. Social Security was enacted as a promise to the citizens of this country that, when they could no longer work, they would still be able to meet their basic needs and live a life of dignity and self-sufficiency in retirement.

The program has been incredibly successful at keeping that promise. Today, more than 60 million older adults, disabled workers, and their families depend on Social Security to make ends meet. At a time when pensions are becoming a rarity, and as personal retirement savings lose ground to the cost of living, Social Security has become even more critical to keeping America’s workers and their families from living in poverty. Social Security keeps 22 million people out of poverty each year, and more than 61% of all older SS beneficiaries rely on SS for half or more of their income.

In order to ensure that the program is meeting the growing needs of today’s seniors—as well as future generations—we must make some important changes to the Social Security system. Read More

High Stakes for Older Adults in 2017

By | Affordable Care Act, BLOG, Health Care, Health Care Defense, HOMEPAGE, Safety Net Defense, SENIOR POVERTY | No Comments
With the New Year upon us, one thing is clear: the stakes could not be higher for older adults in 2017.

As the number of people age 65 and over living in America continues to rise, new leadership in Washington, DC is promising to dramatically reform and reduce the safety net upon which older adults rely. These changes – should they occur – will negatively impact all older adults, but they will cause particular harm to the millions of older adults already living in or near poverty. Read More

What You (And the WHCOA) Missed Last Week

By | BLOG, HOMEPAGE, SENIOR POVERTY | No Comments
If you were out of the office last week enjoying the Holidays and ringing in the New Year you may have missed two important news items.

The first, an Atlantic article, projects a shocking rise in senior poverty between now and 2050. Renowned economist, Teresa Ghilarducci from the New School for Social Research, used current rates of senior poverty to determine that unless we take action now to strengthen our country’s retirement system, 25 million elderly Americans will be poor in 2050. That’s more people than the entire populations of Florida, New York, and 46 other states (only California and Texas currently have more than 25 million people living in them).

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Senior Poverty in Today’s Census Report

By | BLOG, HOMEPAGE, Medicaid, Medicare, SENIOR POVERTY, Social Security, Supplemental Security Income | No Comments
Here are three quick take-aways from our first look at today’s United States Census Income and Poverty report.

1. Women over 75 are at particular risk of poverty. According to the official poverty measure, 14.7% of women over age 75 live in poverty. This is nearly double the rate of men in this age group (7.6%). America’s oldest women also experience significantly higher poverty rates than women 65 to 75 (10.1%) years old. This data confirms what we already knew – that women are more likely than their male counterparts to be poor as they age. This is the result of a variety of economic and social policies that we have yet to address. This video provides a window into what life is like for older women struggling in poverty. Today’s data also demonstrates something else significant – that the older women grow, the more likely they are to be poor. This is an important reminder that any data that looks just at people 65 and over as a single, monolithic group will significantly undercount the challenges of poverty facing older adults that are in their 70s, 80s, 90s and beyond. Read More

CUFF Act Won’t Fight Crime, But it Will Fight Poor People

By | BLOG, LITIGATION, SENIOR POVERTY, Supplemental Security Income | No Comments

The misguided policy that nearly made Rosa Martinez homeless is rearing its ugly head again. Rosa Martinez, a California woman whose disability benefits were stopped because the Social Security Administration mistook her for a Florida woman with the same name, was Justice in Aging’s lead Plaintiff in the case Martinez v. Astrue.

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Social Security Continues Discriminating Against Same Sex Married Couples By Making Them Pay Thousands of Dollars for Agency Mistake

By | BLOG, HOMEPAGE, LGBT, LITIGATION, Supplemental Security Income | No Comments
Hugh Held and Orion Masters of Los Angeles, hugh-orienCalifornia have been together for more than 20 years. When marriage to a person of the same sex became legal in California for a brief period in 2008, they were excited to ‘take the plunge’ and exercise a right they did not expect they would ever have when they first met. Little did they anticipate that their marriage would one day put them in economic peril.

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